Хаас за Канада


Ромен Грожан:
You’ll have some updates on your racecar for the Canadian Grand Prix. When new parts and pieces are added to your car, how important is that FP1 session to understand how they affect the car in an actual race setting? FP1 is normally about tires and aero, and with having updates on the car, we need to make sure in FP1 that it’s working as expected. Another relatively new wrinkle for Canada is the Pink hypersoft tire. You got a lot of experience with it at its debut in Monaco. Did it perform as you expected it, or did it present some new challenges you hadn’t seen before? I think it worked as expected in qualifying, even though I don’t think we got the best of them. We’ve got to get a bit more understanding of them before heading to Canada. In the race, I’ve got to be honest, the three different compounds just didn’t work for us. We were just cruising around, not driving, not pushing as hard as we wanted. The Circuit Gilles Villeneuve is a semi-street circuit. Is there anything you can take from Monaco and apply to Montreal, especially considering Pirelli is bringing the same tire compounds from Monaco? Tire compounds are going to be the number one priority for us to understand with the new package. The circuit is very different. It is much more high speed with much more curb riding, so the setups are quite different. It was warm in Monaco, but that’s not always the case in Montreal. How does the outside temperature affect the Pink hypersoft? Temperature affects all tires, and we’ve got a little bit less understanding of the hypersoft right now. We’ll see how it goes in Montreal. It can be very warm or very cold there. Hopefully, it’s going to be a nice sunny weekend. We’ve talked tires and engines this year, but one thing we haven’t talked much about this year is brakes. That’s a good thing, isn’t it? After the team’s travails with brakes the last two years, is it safe to say you’ve found the right package for this year? Absolutely. I’m loving the brakes we’re running. I haven’t had an issue with them, and the feeling has been perfect. That box is ticked. Canada is known as the hardest-braking grand prix of the year. What do you need to make the most of your car’s braking capability, and how do you manage your brakes for the entire, 70-lap race? Canada is very hard on the brakes, but our cooling should be better. Sometimes you can do some lift-and-coast, especially when the car is full of fuel at the beginning of the race. You want to try to save the brakes a bit and not overheat them, so they’re good by the end of the race when you’re trying to push them, or by pit stop time. A good brake package gives a driver confidence. Has getting a handle on the team’s brake package allowed you to push this year’s car harder, allowing for the speed you’ve shown this season? I think it’s a part of it, definitely. Braking is key, especially at races like Baku or Monaco. I’ve been very happy, and it allows me to get the best of the car. Montreal is home to one of your best finishes in Formula One – a second-place effort in 2012. What do you remember about that race and how did you achieve that result? That was a great race. I started P7. I had a one-stop strategy while everyone else was on a two-stop strategy. Initially, I thought I would finish fifth or sixth as I was stuck behind the Mercedes of (Nico) Rosberg. I couldn’t overtake. Then, everyone pitted. The ones who didn’t were really struggling with grip, so I could overtake them. I didn’t quite have the pace to chase Lewis (Hamilton) and take the win. How important was that second-place finish at Montreal in 2012 during the early portion of your Formula One career? It was a great race and, obviously, a great result. I always try to do my best. It was a good race. I enjoyed it. It’s always important to strive for the highest finish you can and be as high on the podium as possible. What is your favorite part of Circuit Gilles Villeneuve? The whole track. I absolutely love it. I really enjoy racing there. It’s always a great feeling. Is there a specific portion of Circuit Gilles Villeneuve that is more challenging than other aspects of the track? I think it’s turns one, two, three, four, five, six and seven – they’re all quite challenging. That first part of the circuit – it’s a bit more low speed, and it’s a bit more close to the walls – that’s the part that’s the most challenging. Explain a lap around Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, especially now after competing there with the faster, current-generation car. Turn one – you carry much more entry speed – and it’s the same into five, six, seven. You carry more entry speed and you go hard on the throttle. Those are the big differences from the past.
Кевин Магнусен:
You’ll have some updates on your racecar for the Canadian Grand Prix. When new parts and pieces are added to your car, how important is that FP1 session to understand how they affect the car in an actual race setting? In FP1 we’re going to do some aero running to get numbers on the aero sensors, and get a correlation check from the real car and the CFD and wind tunnel model. I don’t think we’re going to do anything unusual. I think we’re just going to do the normal thing, as we always do in FP1. Another relatively new wrinkle for Canada is the Pink hypersoft tire. You got a lot of experience with it at its debut in Monaco. Did it perform as you expected it, or did it present some new challenges you hadn’t seen before? I think the hypersoft tire is a good tire, though in Monaco I think it was still too hard – it was difficult to switch on. Hopefully, in Canada it will be a little bit easier. You’ve got longer straights to put load on the tires at high speed to switch them on. The Circuit Gilles Villeneuve is a semi-street circuit. Is there anything you can take from Monaco and apply to Montreal, especially considering Pirelli is bringing the same tire compounds from Monaco? Of course, we learned a bit about the hypersoft tire in Monaco. We’re going to try and work with that information and get the best out of the tire in Canada. It was warm in Monaco, but that’s not always the case in Montreal. How does the outside temperature affect the Pink hypersoft? It wasn’t particularly warm in Monaco, it was actually quite normal. I think that tarmac was about 40 degrees. I think sometimes it can be the same in Montreal. I don’t think it’s going to be too big a factor. We’ve talked tires and engines this year, but one thing we haven’t talked much about this year is brakes. That’s a good thing, isn’t it? After the team’s travails with brakes the last two years, is it safe to say you’ve found the right package for this year? Yes, no problems with brakes. What is your favorite part of Circuit Gilles Villeneuve? There’s lots of great places around Circuit Gilles Villeneuve. The most famous one is the last chicane, and it’s a really challenging part of the track, as well. It’s probably the most difficult corner on the track, and it’s the last corner, so there’s a lot of pressure when you get to the chicane. You’ve done almost the whole lap, and if you’re on a good lap, there’s lots of pressure to get this part right, as well. It’s always a corner where if you haven’t got a perfect lap, you can try and make it up in that last chicane. If you’re on a good lap, you might not want to take as much risk in that last chicane. So, it’s a really interesting part of the track. I think turns three and four – that chicane’s really technical. You’ve got some places on the track where you’re riding curbs a lot – that’s technical as well. There are some good places for overtaking with long straights. It usually offers up a very interesting race. Explain a lap around Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, especially now after competing there with the faster, current-generation car. It’s kind of a low-speed track with a lot of chicanes and big braking zones. It’s a bit bumpy in places, but there are good opportunities for overtaking.
Гюнтер Щайнер:
The Canadian Grand Prix marks the first race where Haas F1 Team is bringing significant updates to its racecars. Where have you chosen to develop and what are you looking to achieve with these updates? We’ve got quite significant changes – front wing, floor, and all the bargeboard area – we’ve made those updates. Obviously, their aim is to go faster, to gain us speed. A lot of people brought their upgrades to Spain. We decided to bring them to Canada to have a little bit more time, because we’re still a small team and cannot react as quickly as the big ones. In addition to new updates to the car in Canada, you have a relatively new engine from Ferrari. You trialed this engine in Monaco – did it do what you wanted it to as you prepare for a more power-sensitive track in Circuit Gilles Villeneuve? The upgrades in the engines are small because they are so highly developed. To find big gains is very difficult but, for sure, every time Ferrari gives us an upgrade, it is for a good reason, as it has more power. With teams only allowed to use three engines throughout the course of this 21-race season, can you explain how you’re cycling these engines so that you get the most out of them without wearing them out too quickly? You introduce your first replacement engine, basically engine number two, at about this point in the season. You use engine number one for FP1 and FP2, but not for FP3, as you put the newest engine in on Saturday morning for FP3, then for qualifying and the race. Right now, we are up to plan with our engine. If it all goes well, we should get to the end of the season without having to use a fourth engine and get a grid penalty. Last year, teams could use four engines in a season and, on top of that, there were only 20 races compared to this year’s slate of 21 races. How has the reduced number of engines you can use and the increase in races affected your preparation when it comes to engine management? The engine management is done by Ferrari. They’ve worked hard on it so the car can do the mileage, and so that we can do the mileage with three engines over the year. Another relatively new wrinkle for Canada is the Pink hypersoft tire. You got a lot of experience with it at its debut in Monaco. Did it perform as you expected it, or did it present some new challenges you hadn’t seen before? It performs like it should. It’s a proper qualifying tire, and it seems to do ok in the race for a reduced amount of laps. It was warm in Monaco, but that’s not always the case in Montreal. How does the outside temperature affect the Pink hypersoft? In theory, the hypersoft should last longer because of the reduced temperature, but we need to see how abrasive the track is and what we can get out of the tire. We’ve talked tires and engines this year, but one thing we haven’t talked much about this year is brakes. That’s a good thing, isn’t it? After the team’s travails with brakes the last two years, what allowed you to find the right package for this year? Brakes have not been a talking point. I think our guys did a good job introducing a different supplier for our brakes this year. We haven’t had issues yet, and I hope it remains like this. Canada is known as the hardest-braking grand prix of the year. What do you need to make the most of your car’s braking capability, and how do your drivers manage their brakes for the entire, 70-lap race? You use a brake which has longer life. Maybe the braking is not as good as it is normally, but you need the additional life on it so you can finish the race. You also have to work on the cooling so you don’t overheat them. If you overheat them, then you cannot get to the end. A good brake package gives a driver confidence. Has getting a handle on the team’s brake package allowed Grosjean and Magnussen to push this year’s car harder, allowing for the speed the team has shown this season? Absolutely. More confidence means more speed. A good brake package is a consistent one – you always know what it’s going to do. We have that this year, and I’m sure if you ask the drivers, they’re happy with it because they know what they’ve got when they’re braking for a corner. Cooling the brakes is key, but where do you find that balance between forcing air into the brake ducts to keep them cool and massaging the airflow over the car to create downforce? That is the juggling act, but we have quite a few options in the cooling package of the brakes to achieve that balance. It won’t be until mid-October when Haas F1 Team has a home race with the United States Grand Prix at Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas. But considering the geographic proximity of Montreal to the U.S., do you view the Canadian Grand Prix as a quasi home race? Absolutely. Montreal is actually a little bit closer than Austin to our headquarters in Kannapolis. It’s our shortest travel to a race, and I love that.


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