Хаас за Бразилия


Ромен Грожан:
While you’re finishing the 2019 season and simultaneously preparing for the 2020 season, the new technical regulations for 2021 have finally been announced. The 2021 cars will look different and perform different. What is your take on the 2021 car’s aesthetics and its expected performance? I think they look cool. I think they look futuristic without being away from what Formula One has been known for as a racecar. I’m very happy with the way they look. Performance-wise, we’ll need to wait and see what the track brings, and if it’s got all the desired effects. Generally, I’m pleased with what I’ve seen so far. All of these changes should allow a trailing car to keep roughly 85 percent of its downforce compared to the 45 percent of downforce a trailing car gets with the current regulations. Can you explain how this added downforce will allow you more of an opportunity to attack and, ultimately, pass the car in front of you? At the moment, every time you get behind a car you lose a lot of downforce, then you slide. It’s something you expect, but then the surface of the tires overheat and you completely lose grip. You can’t attack. If we don’t lose so much downforce then, hopefully, the tires won’t overheat as much, and therefore we’ll be able to stay closer and get more passing. That’s the idea and it should be OK. The potential downside to the 2021 rules package is that the cars get 25 kilograms heavier, going from 743 kilograms to 768 kilograms. Does this mean that while the on-track action will theoretically be closer, will the speeds be slower than they are now, or will teams eventually refine their racecars enough to where they are faster than the car of today? Formula One cars are the fastest on Earth, so I think if we lose a couple of seconds a lap, but for better racing, I don’t think that’s the end of the world. We’ve got to see the big picture here. Interlagos appears to be a very physical track, and heat often plays a role in the performance of the car and the driver. Considering these variables, how do you attack the track? Sao Paulo is one of my favorite tracks on the calendar. I think it’s really good and I’m very much looking forward to going there. It’s an anti-clockwise layout, so it does affect your neck, especially on Friday, but the body adapts very quickly. I’m looking forward to the weekend.
Кевин Магнусен:
While you’re finishing the 2019 season and simultaneously preparing for the 2020 season, the new technical regulations for 2021 have finally been announced. The 2021 cars will look different and perform different. What is your take on the 2021 car’s aesthetics and its expected performance? I think it’s pretty exciting to see the new regulations and the new cars for 2021. As is the case with every new Formula One regulation and with new-look cars, it’ll take a little time to get used to, then I think we’ll start loving the new looks. My initial feeling is good. The look is pretty good. The most important thing is that the racing gets closer and better, which I think there’s a good chance it might be. All of these changes should allow a trailing car to keep roughly 85 percent of its downforce compared to the 45 percent of downforce a trailing car gets with the current regulations. Can you explain how this added downforce will allow you more of an opportunity to attack and, ultimately, pass the car in front of you? If the wake of the car in front is less, the disturbed air is less, then you’ll be able to follow closer and you’ll get a better chance of overtaking. That’s good and, hopefully, it’ll improve enough so that we don’t need DRS (Drag Reduction System). Hopefully, the quality of the passes will become better, as well. It’s all good having lots of passing, but if it’s all done with DRS on a straight line, it’s not really that exciting. I’d rather see the same amount of passing, or less, but better quality racing. That’s the point – to get more exciting racing. The potential downside to the 2021 rules package is that the cars get 25 kilograms heavier, going from 743 kilograms to 768 kilograms. Does this mean that while the on-track action will theoretically be closer, will the speeds be slower than they are now, or will teams eventually refine their racecars enough to where they are faster than the car of today? I think increasing the weight of the car is not a positive, but I guess it must have been inevitable, otherwise they wouldn’t have done it. I do think the teams will overcome it over time. Probably the first couple of years, the cars will be a bit slower – if not quite a bit slower – then they’ll probably get close to where they are now at some point. Teams always find more and more performance. Hopefully, the cars will be very quick again. We all like to go fast and have a lot of grip. We want to drive the fastest cars on the planet. Interlagos appears to be a very physical track, and heat often plays a role in the performance of the car and the driver. Considering these variables, how do you attack the track? Interlagos is a great track. It’s a little bit like a go-kart track. It’s all in a small area without long stretches between corners. I’m looking forward to going there and hopefully getting a good result.
Гюнтер Щайнер:
While you’re finishing the 2019 season and simultaneously preparing for the 2020 season, the new technical regulations for 2021 have finally been announced. The 2021 cars will look different and perform different. What is your take on the 2021 car’s aesthetics and its expected performance? The car – it’s a little bit different, and it is a change. These are the regulations. We live with them and try to get the best out of it. We’ll try to achieve what the new regulations want to achieve, with more overtaking and a closing of the field. Ground effects return to Formula One cars in 2021 after a nearly 40-year absence. The point of ground effects is to lessen the need/impact of wings on racecars to lessen the amount of dirty air. This means all new bodywork and no more complex bargeboards and a simplified front wing and a rear wing with nearly no endplates. As such, where does development happen on the 2021 car? Relatedly, how important does the floor now become to the performance of the 2021 car? The development, whatever the regulations, is always in aerodynamics. That’s the main thing to develop. There is still enough freedom where we can develop areas of the car to make them different from each other. We’ll try to get a little bit more performance out than our competitors. The floor is always one of the most important things on a Formula One car. It’s always been important and will continue to be, so not a lot will change in that respect. You’re always working to get everything out of the car from wherever you can. Do these rules still allow Formula One teams to be Formula One teams, meaning they can be creative and come up with their own designs that differ from their competition? Yes. In the end, that was achieved. It was the biggest argument between FIA, FOM (Formula One Management) and the teams. The teams didn’t want to have a single-make car or be boxed in too much. We didn’t want to end up with a GP1 series. In the end, FOM opened up the creativity by opening up the regulations. So, hopefully, we can achieve it. The potential downside to the 2021 rules package is that the cars get 25 kilograms heavier, going from 743 kilograms to 768 kilograms. Does this mean that while the on-track action will theoretically be closer, will the speeds be slower than they are now, or will teams eventually refine their racecars enough to where they are faster than the car of today? Nobody wants heavier cars in racing in general, and even more so in Formula One. It doesn’t make the cars look as smooth when they ride around. With all the technology and the safety aspects and the hybrid technology, you cannot do without it. I don’t think the 25 kilos will be the biggest factor in making the cars slower – it’s more the aerodynamics. Maybe at the beginning we are not where we want to be, but I’m pretty sure we’ll end up with the cars back to being as fast as they are now. A lot depends on the tires, as well. Beyond all of these technical regulations, is the best change to level the playing field in 2021 the mandate of a $175 million cost cap? How does a cost cap help Haas F1 Team, an organization that has always been incredibly efficient with its dollars and operates well under this cost cap? I think in the beginning the cost cap – how it’s defined now – will close the gap, but it will not take the gap away. We are far from spending $175 million at the moment, and the big teams are well over that. The big teams need to come down, and they will get down to $175 million, but most of the other teams are well within that figure. Hopefully, it closes the gap to start off, then we’ll see. Maybe there’s a second step in the cost cap.


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